Wednesday, November 19, 2014

On Not Believing in God.

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I feel like I have to put a disclaimer on this because inevitably someone will take what I say personally, or the wrong way. Below I share some thoughts about religion (my lack of actually) and nothing I say is meant to question your beliefs or you as a person. These are just my thoughts and my own experiences, and it's important to me that you know that I respect ALL of you, all of your beliefs, and your right to practice, or to not practice any religion you so choose. The beauty of this world is that we are all so different, and I love that this is a safe place for me to share pieces of my life. Thank you.


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There have been times in my life where I so badly wished I could believe in god. Any god, really. Your god, the god my friends believe in. And believe me, I've tried. I grew up going to church and learning all about it, I looked up into those rafters and waited to hear a voice. I went to confessional and told the priest all about the things I did wrong, my 8-year-old imagination running wild, imagining God to be right behind that little door. If I opened it would I see him? If I did all my Hail Marys would he appear? But he didn't. And I understand that faith is about faith- in about believing that there is someone, something there...but for me that belief just never took root.

It's a gray area for me in a way though, because sometimes I think there has to be something, you know? Energies swirling around when we die, finding a new home in the ground, the trees, the blue blue sky. Maybe all of it gets put back into the atmosphere and becomes part of everything we are and do. Maybe. Hank on the other hand, believes that when we die, we die. There is no afterlife, no energy taking root in a new home, that it is just the end. And I can see that being the case, much more than I can see a perfect heaven that is designed from all of our hopes and dreams...but I just don't know.

I'm fascinated with religion though. Many of my friends are Christian and I always find it interesting to hear what they believe and why they do. I think it's amazing that they have that kind of faith and can just believe, be it Christianity or Buddhism or whatever else. I love learning about all of it, but in the same breath my thoughts go to all of the bad in the world and it doesn't make sense to me. It never will. I don't understand why children get sick and die, why horrible accidents happen and why wars and genocide and whatever other bad, terrible things I could name here take place. WHY. And so my mind can't grasp it, I can't believe that some old book written by old men could ever be the blueprint for how I'm supposed to live my life. I can't believe that we should ever tell anyone else who to marry or how to live, or make someone else feel bad for living outside of what we believe to be the "right" way to live.

There have been so many times in my life I wanted so badly to lean on something, to pray to someone. When my Grandma died I wished I knew where she went. But I didn't- I don't. I have no idea. And when all 19 of our firefighters died, and Andrew was just gone, it was shocking to me to hear people say there was a reason for it- it was God's plan. No. Nanny, Andrew, Kendall. I don't know where they are. I don't know if everything they did in their life determined some sort of afterlife. And I have no idea if I'll ever see them again. Honestly, I don't believe I ever will.

So what do I believe in? I believe in science. And I believe in doing the right thing and being kind. And I believe that there is a reason things happen and that the universe has a plan, at least sometimes. I believe that we get what we put out there, and at times I do think that karma must be real. I'm well aware I contradict myself and sometimes these beliefs don't make sense to me either. And maybe that's all this part of my life will ever be. Constantly questioning, not really knowing. And maybe at the very end of my life I'll find that there is something there, that all along it was right in front of me. Maybe I'll find out I was completely wrong but if you want to know the truth...I'm pretty sure we'll ALL be wrong.

I'll keep on this journey though, reading and thinking and questioning. I'll keep living this life as if it's all I've got, this here and now. I'll make decisions based on what I believe to be true and right, and love as hard as I can. And really, that's enough for me. If this one life is all I have I want to do it right and do it with love. Because at the end of the day that's what I believe in and focus everything on- love and love and love.

Thank you for reading my thoughts. <3




*read more about this topic on this blog here and here.
and more on this topic, not on this blog here and here.
(be sure to click that last link if you have a moment)

85 comments:

  1. Hey Danielle! I've been reading your blog for a while but this is my first time commenting.

    I always hesitate to write about religion (or my lack of one) on my blog because it is such a deeply personal thing, and whenever something is a deeply held belief, any criticism of it or even questions can seem like a personal attack. But I also put my faith in science, and I think it's a disservice to the world that religion is not allowed to be examined and discussed in the public dialog in the same way that everything else is. There is a lot of beauty and magic and the same wonder that I used to find in religion to be found in just learning about our universe and the discoveries that scientists are making every day.

    I will say though that the bad things that happen, outside of freak accidents and natural disasters, can be laid at the feet of humans. War, poverty, diseases that come as a result of lack of clean water and adequate food are all avoidable, but maybe because it's our belief that a god is looking out for everyone, we don't take enough responsibility for what can be done to stop this needless suffering.

    In the last few years, I've realized that I don't need to know my purpose for being here or the purpose of all humans. All the freedom comes in getting to decide our own purpose and make whatever we can out of our time here.

    Loved this post! Thank you for sharing.

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  2. Thank you for your honesty, Danielle. It's beautiful. I always appreciate the realness of a person who actually thinks through their beliefs rather than so many who just embrace some theology without much thought. While I'm a pretty die-hard Jesus gal, the same struggles you mentioned with faith are so universal. It's hard to reconcile the whole pain aspect of life with a good God. While I'm glad I don't believe in a God who I can figure out in a day, there's certainly days where I wish I had more answers. Hopefully we continue to have beautiful community to live life with and make room for these hard, honest conversations. Thanks for sharing your heart.

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    1. I just had to stop and recognize the gracious heart that wrote this right here. I've had so many interactions with people who were deeply religious yet deeply judgmental.

      Your response, as someone with completely different beliefs than Danielle's, was perfect.
      While I lean more in her direction, I do believe that Jesus existed and was an amazing person who taught in love. You, my dear, are a true representation of his teachings. <3

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    2. Love it-- Both Brittany & Becky. Proud of you both. And to Danielle-- I love your heart and your openness, honestly and bravery to share with a world of people who might not accept your honestly in such a loving way. My prayer is that you will- in this lifetime, come to a place of understanding and knowledge about what is truth and what is not. I know you said in your post that you are doubtful that it will ever happen. All I will say is that I hope you will keep searching and keep seeking truth so that maybe someday you will understand and come to a place of faith. Love, Brittany

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  3. I am right there with you sista. My mom was raised Catholic but we only went to church as a family for a very short time, so I never grew up believing. I at times do wish there was a higher power I could look up to though!

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  4. "I can't believe that some old book written by old men could ever be the blueprint for how I'm supposed to live my life." This sums up my feelings towards it too. Great, honest post

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  5. yes, Yes, YES!

    THIS!

    I am right there with you. I grew up going to private school (albeit Lutheran, not Catholic); I wasn't allowed to watch TV or listen to the radio. I never truly believed. I went to school and church and youth group because that's what I was expected to do, because that's the way it always was. And then one day I started questioning everything and none of it made sense. Ever since then, I've been an adamant non-believer...but I'm not a preach-y non-believer...those people are just as annoying as preach-y religious people.

    I don't go to church, nor do I take my kids. However, I don't shut them off from religion, either. We keep major religious texts from different religions around the house...right next to picture books on evolution. I want my kids to grow up with a choice. I want them to decide what's right for them. My mom "forced" me to go to private school and to church because it's what she believed. If I "force" my kids to not believe in god and tell them that science reigns supreme just because it's what does it for me, I'm no better. I want my kids to make their own informed choice.

    In this blogging community I am always amazed at the sheer number of religious women who blog. Sometimes it bothers me (most of the time it doesn't) because I never feel like my truth, my reality, my demographic is truly represented, so it's really great to read that a blogger with as large of a following as you have is also a non-religious, fact-based science loving gal.

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  6. My mother died eight weeks ago. Sitting at the funeral, I just couldn't relate to any part of the Catholic service: the language, the ceremonial aspect. What I did relate to was the eulogy I'd written for her.
    I'd love to believe. Especially at this sad, sad time. She was a good person who was still young. I would give anything to know she's still... somewhere. Able to see her grandchildren growing.
    But I've found that any belief I had prior to this has been rocked and doubt has taken over.
    I've always been interested in Paganism. Not dancing naked in the woods, but moving with the seasons and appreciating the power and beauty within nature. Simple and all around us.
    As for what people do to one another in the name of religion? Inexplicable and very, very wrong.
    Sarah.

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  7. I've never seen anyone who believed in everything the same way that I do. Where I work everyone, I MEAN EVERYONE, goes to church and talks about God's plan constantly. I listen and smile and try to be polite but it gets hard sometimes. I never keep my mouth shut though when it comes to talking about who we should marry or what's right and wrong. Thankfully only a few that I know won't listen to other people's opinions. I teach 2nd grade and it's so hard when my children ask me if I believe in God. I don't want to upset or confuse them so I always try to instill in the that it's ok to believe in what makes you the happiest. This is a long comment, sorry!!, but I'm sure you'll get some negativity for this and I just wanted you to know I thought this entry was wonderful and it hits so close to home for me. Especially when my parents died when I was 19, I felt lost and I too wish I could have prayed, I even tried. But it's just not for me.

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  8. Great post Danielle, I really enjoyed reading your thoughts on this! Regardless of what we all believe in, it sure is important to be present in the now and love our surroundings now because at the end of the day, who knows! And we'll never know, so focus on your everyday truths and be kind to every living soul. Thanks for sharing!

    Lauren / And Together We

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  9. I agree with you 100%. When my mom died, I wanted so badly to believe that she was in heaven looking down on me and I wish that I could get comfort in knowing that I would see her again one day. I am jealous of my friends who believe this. But I can't make myself believe. Like you, I believe in being kind and living a life where I am happy with who I am and how I treat and make people feel.

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  10. I'm not sure how you came onto my bloglovin feed, but this is EXACTLY word for word how I feel. Exactly. :)

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  11. Pray to God and ask Him to reveal Himself to you. Ask for His help. The bible says that those who seek God will find Him, but it has to be honest in your request. Matthew says (vs 7:7-8) "Ask and it will be give to you; seek and you shall find; knock, and it shall be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; the one who seeks finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened."

    I will be praying for you. Feel free to email me, if you ever want to chat. :)

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  12. I'm sorry to hear that you feel lost and confused. It is hard to believe that there is a God that makes everything good but allows bad things to happen. But that is not God that causes the bad things to happen. Sometimes we forget that there is evil, that there is Satan, and human will. But in every bad situation, there is God speaking to the hearts of people to be missionaries. God speaks to us differently than we speak to another human. It is that little twinge in your head when you know what is right and what is wrong. It could be a friend praying over you or something they say unintentionally that sticks in our mind. The first step in really understanding and building a relationship with God, is taking a leap of faith and see how He works in your life. Believing in God doesn't mean that everything will be perfect in your life because you believe in Him. It is a slow process where He changes your heart, where He slowly makes you feel full of life, where you can love and forgive those that caused you harm. If you want to know Him, start by speaking to Him, asking Him to show Himself to you. And remember, it won't happen instantly. Be blessed.

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  13. Thank you for your beautiful honesty. It is so refreshing to see someone put into words this real struggle that many people, including myself, go through when trying to comprehend the incomprehensible.

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  14. Ahhh this is wonderful. Sometimes it feels like I'm the only blogger that doesn't believe in God but here you are making me feel less of an outcast (and also so many of these awesome blogger's comments!). I guess it's a touchy thing to talk about here on the Internet surrounded by so many religious bloggers. I've been openly atheist most of my life and yet I've never mentioned it on my little blog space. Thanks for being so brave and opening up to us

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  15. THANK YOU for posting this!!! Why does it feel like agnostic/atheist bloggers are so few and far between sometimes? Anyway, it's nice. It makes me feel less alone. Thank you, thank you.

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  16. thank you writing this. your words ring so true. my husband and i are raising our son in an agnostic home which at times causes strife among family members. but i have never needed religion in my life, rather i choose to live through my experiences and always through love. thanks again.

    www.whimsical-girl.com

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  17. I really find this totally refreshing. Sometimes I'm actually surprised (particularly in the blog world), how many people list Jesus or God as the firs thing to describe themselves.

    I honestly struggle with the word God so much... I was raised Catholic, including a Catholic public school, and until I moved out and went to university (neither of my parents are particularly religious, my dads parents were) and learned about all the other religions in the world did I honestly start to feel a little bit of resentment and like I had been brainwashed a lot of my childhood.

    I am completely respectful of what other people believe and that it is a choice. I do believe that some people need the comfort and answers religion provides them with.

    I on the other hand and perfectly comfortable exploring and finding different answers to the questions I have.

    What I believe in is the universe and our energy. I believe we all have the power in manifesting the life we wish to live, and what we put out there is probably the most important thing we can do. I believe in gratitude, positivity and showing appreciation. I believe in grace, humility and kindness.

    I also believe that some people use the umbrella of religion and treat people in nasty ways for not sharing beliefs or feel better going to church on Sunday to 'wash' away all of the bad things that happened Mon-Sat. It's a bit hypocritical. The whole believe what I believe, or you're a bad person, you're wrong and you're sad and not saved... that just turns my stomach. So I too turn away from that way of life.

    Anyway, thank-you for this post. It's so nice to hear people speak up about agnostic and atheist belief systems. The closest word I would use to describe myself is Pantheist (you should look it up!)

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  18. Oh man, thanks for taking the courage to write this. I'm pagan and grew up in a pagan home, but I never talked about it on my blog until recently. It was SO SCARY to share, because I was worried about backlash or losing readers. But you know, it was remarkably well received and I really enjoyed connecting with the people who came out of the woodwork to support me and show interest. Thanks for being honest with your readers and letting us get to know you a little better :)

    Cat
    http://oddlylovely.com

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  19. Thank you so much for being so honest & brave with this post. I am very religious. I was born into a religion, went on my path to find if it was the right thing for me and had that feeling confirmed. However, I don't think religion is what makes us good people. And for that, I loved your thoughts on living your life the best you believe you can and in putting good energy into the universe. I'm also a firm believer that Karma is real. And at the end of the day what truly matters in this world is the kind of person you are. For some that coincides with a belief in something greater. And for others it doesn't. But there is never room for judgement based on what someone does or does not do and I really related to your comments on that. Thank you again, I just adore you & everything you and your sweet family try to make of this life.

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  20. I haven't commented in a while, but I wanted to let you know how much I loved this post. I relate so much to it and just wanted to thank you for that connection. I've recently had people be so confused by the fact that I don't believe in a god, yet somehow (!) I'm kind and generous and raising a daughter who is incredibly sweet and thoughtful.

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  21. Thank you, Dani,

    I've read so many blog posts on believing and religion, but I've never seen one on not believing. I think you've done something great by putting this out in the blog world. Thank you thank you thank you!

    Love,
    Annie
    The MAMA Gazette

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  22. This is exactly how I feel. Your words could easily have been my own. I'm not sure what it is that makes a person be a believer or not, but one thing is for sure: it is a heated topic. I appreciate your transparency on the subject. And I also appreciate that you respect the beliefs of others. The world needs more acceptance.

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  23. Wonderful as always, Dani! Couldn't agree with you more. People who believe in science should feel free to be outspoken about it - science is breathtakingly beautiful, humbling, and awe inspiring.

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  24. I enjoyed this a lot even though my experience is quite the opposite! I believe in God and would call myself a Christian, but there are caveats, e.g, I'm pro-choice, pro loving or marrying whoever you want etc. However, the UK is a hugely secular society, which I don't mind, I definitely believe faith and politics don't mix, but I feel I will he ridiculed if I open up about my faith and how I feel it guides me to be a better person. God is talked about with contempt so often and faith taken as a sign of weakness/stupidity. Especially, being a science teacher, teaching things like evolutionary biology, people ask me how I can believe that AND believe in a God. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on faith in a non-judgemental way and with such honesty and openness!

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  25. I remember you writing about this for one of the 'Journal Days' and I loved your words then and love them in this post as well. I have never been a believer but it wasn't until I was in my early twenties until I felt more comfortable talking about it. I hate that so many religious people are judgy and hurtful towards us as if we are less than them or "bad people". Thank you and those that have commented for making me feel less alone when it comes to that part of my life.

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  26. WOW this is so so well written. i feel exactly the same, it's like that's my thoughts in your writing. thank you x

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  27. This is my first comment (from a long-time reader!), but you brought me out of lurker status with this lovely post. THANK YOU for sharing, so eloquently and honestly, something that often feels scary to share. Living in the Midwest, surrounded by religious family and coworkers, my husband and I often feel alone and criticized in living our lives and raising our daughter without Christian faith. So I just wanted to say thank you for writing this post -- it certainly made me feel connected and understood -- and all the thoughtful comments show what a kind and understanding network you've helped build!

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  28. This was beautiful. There are so many blogs written by religious people (and I love them), but it's nice to know I'm not the only non-believing blog reader out there. :) Thank you for posting!

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  29. This is so well-written, and it's exactly how I feel. Thanks for putting this vulnerable part of yourself out here.

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  30. I loved this post and relate in so many ways. Thanks for sharing!

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  31. My thoughts exactly. Thank you.

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  32. yes girl yes. loved this. as a reader thats been reading for years, I've only ever commented once ( about where we are both from in NJ, I think it was about delicious orchards!) but I feel the need to let you know this post rang so so true. thank you.

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  33. it takes a lot of strength and vulnerability to be able to share such personal thoughts, questions and doubts publicly. thanks for sharing with us!

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  34. Good job putting into words what I've been thinking.

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  35. Hi there! I am a long-time reader, first time commenter as well. Thank you for this post! I'm a science gal as well, but I also believe that humanity and goodness runs deep in people. Looking around the world, it doesn't feel like that sometimes, I think that's where my faith is.

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  36. Check out "The Shack" by William Young!

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    1. Yes, Brooke! This book changed everything!!

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  37. I dont agree in the saying "Everything happens for a reason" either. I do feel there are situations that occur and we see no point in them until later down the road. I believe in God, I pray and talk to him constantly. I always crack up people when they say, "if God exists, then why do all these bad things happen?" because, the devil is as much as alive as God. A lot of people are so quick to blame God for things, for anything and everything, I have a few times myself, but the world is the devils playground. In my opinion, a lot of people like to believe in science because there is an explanation for everything, an answer for everything, people arent willing to just put their faith in something, in the unknown, people dont like the unknown and not having control over everything. I definitely put my faith in God and nothing else, but Im not perfect, I dont always set good examples, I can curse like a sailor at times, but I know that I try, I try my very best to raise some amazing kids to be amazing adults one day and love them with my whole being. Thank you for your honesty, we need more of that in this world for sure! xoxo

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  38. This is so great. I was just thinking the other day how it is very rare that I come across a blogging mother who is not a Christian and it always made me feel like a little of an outsider. Seeing this is so refreshing. You have perfectly put into words the way I have felt for so long. Thank you for this.

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  39. Thank you for saying this. I follow you on IG. Never comment. But I think saying this, out loud, to your readers, to the mommy community- well it was needed, and awesome. Thank you. I think living and raising kids and being a non believer is A LOT harder... But it's right for me also. Thanks for giving us a voice. Thanks for being honest. Thank you.

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  40. I've been following you on Instagram and reading your blog from time-to-time, but just wanted to comment and say thanks for posting--you put into words a lot of the same things I believe/feel. Thank you:)

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  41. I think it's interesting to put a disclaimer that says it's not meant to question the reader's beliefs. I've always loved reading about your thoughts on religion (or lack of, hehe) and I think what stirs inside us to question is okay. As a Christian, we're meant to ask questions, but there is this culture in the church that punishes us if we do. I loved reading this. I believe in science and God, which sounds crazy. It's like saying I can't believe in math because there is literature. I think both can exist. I hope you post more on the topic. I also have to note- you are one of the most kindest humans I've "met" over the years and you are a perfect example that actions are based on being a good human rather than religion and I love you for that.

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  42. Thank you for your honesty! Even as a Christian, I can relate to this post. My husband is actually a worship pastor. Having doubts in our faith is very common, even among believers. And I do apologize for any "Christian" that has made you feel judged - that is the opposite of what Jesus is about. Thank you again. Such a great read!

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  43. My favorite thing about your blog is how open minded and honest you are. I base most friendships on these traits. I grew up in a Christian family (which is way less strict than Catholicism from what I've heard). Anyway, I was still really intimidated most of my childhood by the sunday school teacher because he would yell at us...it was very strange. My parents divorced and went their separate ways and we stopped going to church. I went from middle school through college and most of my adult life (I'm about to turn 30) just not caring about religion or god or anything. Recently, my anxiety sky rocketed, three aunts died within an 8 month period (one of which was like a mom to me), and my best friend completely stopped talking to me, etc. I was going to therapy for a year, reading about meditating as a final effort before just resorting to taking medicine to calm down. I was broken. Then I read "The Shack"...then a friend invited me to church...

    Turns out the only thing that could make me feel at peace for the first time in a long time...was a higher power. I was completely out of options. I ran out of my own strength and self reliance. Sometimes broken people need faith to simply survive. Hope and peace are two things a lot of people can wish for but not everyone can find...without some help from a power higher than themselves.

    ANYWAY, I love this post. I love hearing everyone's back stories and opinions. We can learn so much from each other while still being loving. Thanks for being kind and open minded.

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  44. Whoa, I feel like I could have written this exactly! When my grandma (who was more like a mom to me) died on my 9th birthday, I stopped having any connection to the religious world. Before she passed, her and I sat down and had a conversation and she told me, if there was a way she could come back to be near me, she would. I've never had any experiences with her, although I've seen her a few times in my dreams. I feel very similar in that I feel there might just be something else out there, energies or what not but I can't commit to fully believing in an existence that doesn't scientifically make sense. But I have the utmost respect for those who spend their life in dedication to their beliefs, as long as they make a point to help others, regardless of their beliefs, along the way. Eventually we'll all find out, right!? Until then, we'll just keep on keepin' on.

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  45. I love when you write about this stuff, and I hate that people feel the need to "pray for you" and try to convert you via the comments... sigh.

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    1. Even if you do not believe in prayer, why would it be horrible for someone to pray for her? We can all agree that prayer to believers is something so special, so heart felt, and something we do to show we care for someone. So why not accept prayer? And it doesn't sound like people are trying to convert her, they are giving their perspective, which is what she's always welcomed on her blog. That's one of the things I absolutely adore about her. She is so open minded, which is what sets her apart from many other unbelievers.

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  46. Thanks for writing!
    Just one of the beauties of being a christian is I no longer seek answers. I know the answers to all of the big questions.

    Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.
    People often say that "seeing is believing"but I challenge you to believe and then you will see!
    If you haven't tasted and seen that The Lord is good then you have no basis of ever saying it can't be/it's not real.
    Going through the motions of confessions and Hail Marys are far from a true relationship with God. If you pray to God and mean it from your heart that you want to understand and are willing surrender, you WONT be disappointed.
    I'm going to close with this:
    I know you would agree that one of us has to be wrong . Either there is a God or there isn't. Heaven or not? Hell or not? If you're correct, then you have nothing to lose, I guess. BUT if I'm correct you have so much to lose out on: Jesus being in control of your life and allll the good that comes from that and eternity in heaven.

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  47. Well I guess my comment didn't post, let's try again, I fully and whole heartedly agree with everything you wrote and it is such a relief to see someone else, so smart and awesome, have the same beliefs as I do. I think loving everyone is all you need too. I love how you worded your post and everything you said!

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  48. Hi! My name is Juliana, I'm a Brasilian girl, and somehow I came into your page. I liked to read your thoughts.
    I have had, many times, these kind of thoughts about God, and about religiion, and about faith. I have so many doubts and questionings... but sometimes I believe in Spiritism (is that how you call it there?), that about Allan Kardec. I kind of stopped thinking about religion and left if beside, for now, because when I try to think, understand, think about what makes sense to me, I get so confused and lost. But someday I'll have to think about it again. Maybe it's not the moment yet.
    See you :)
    kisses

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  49. Have you seen the documentary Oh My God? If I remember correctly David Copperfield likened Jesus to a magician. And it made so much sense to me. What if Copperfield or Dynamo lived 2000 years ago? Couldn't they easily have hoodwinked the masses into believing they are gods? I believe Jesus did exist and that he was special in a way. Perhaps merely smarter and advanced than the rest.
    Anyway, great post Danielle. I loved reading your thoughts in a previous similar post you wrote. And i love this one now too. Your first one actually inspired me to write a post on prayers in school after a mother attacked me for saying that kids of other nationalities and religions should not have to participate in Christian prayers. Morning prayers are mandatory in public schools here in Cyprus. You can read it here if you have the time http://www.georgiesmummy.com/?p=3823- but from my experience with Christian Orthodox people, there is no middle ground and no other god or belief is acceptable. It is one of the many reasons why my son attends a private school. no prayers there and diversity is embraced.

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  50. Thank you for sharing this post. Your thoughts and opinions match mine and its refreshing hearing it from someone else. One of the comments before mine said "sorry you feel lost and confused". For me I honestly felt more lost and confused growing up and trying to be that person that believed in God. All my friends wholeheartedly believed as well as most of my family, and I thought "why can't I? what is wrong with me that I just can't believe" I truly struggled and believed there was something wrong with me. It was only after I accepted myself, my feelings and thoughts about god and religion that I finally felt free. I no longer felt lost and confused. So for me to be honest with myself on how I felt alleviated that lost and confused feeling, and I wonder if its the same for you?

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  51. This is a great post for some thought if you have time :)

    http://shereadstruth.com/2014/11/19/give-thanks-suffering/

    Blessings to you and your family!

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  52. Dani, I so appreciate your post on being non-religious. It's funny how you feel so hesitant to share your beliefs (or lack-of) online, because I think that's exactly how "believers" feel when they aren't online. It's much easier for people with spiritual beliefs to share their views on a computer screen, and hide their views in public. So, I just wanted you to know that you aren't alone in the way you feel. The internet has just become an easier outlet for people to share. When in public, if you were to ask many of us to verbally say exactly what we write, it would be really hard for many of us, because, yes, what we believe is based in faith, and can often come across as crazy. Because we've created a community with like-minded people online, its intentions are never to make others feel left out. It's so we feel less alone. Does that make sense? I hope so. :)

    As someone who didn't grow up in the church, but "found Jesus" at a much older age, all I can say is this: I grew up in a broken home, around broken people, and was very broken myself. When I decided to put my faith in a higher being, and read a book that was based in love, that called me to forgive the people in my past who took away my innocence, that showed me my true identity, and gave me permission to stop leaning on my own understanding to get through this hard life, I became a new person.

    As for the "spiritual" people in your life that you've come across and despised, I'm truly sorry. You have every right to hate the people who have showed evil and stand behind the name of "religion." The fact is that we are all still humans, flawed and selfish. As for Christians, we've have been given a book that demands us to show love to others in every situation, but that doesn't mean every Christian does it. And for that, I'm sorry. My hope is that if you ever decide to research deeper into having a relationship with Jesus, and not being part of a flawed "religion," look to what He calls his people to do, not what His flawed people are doing. Because, the evil and hate that is happening in the name of "religion" is not of God.

    Also, I hope that this comment doesn't offend anyone. If you're interested in talking more, please email me: moriahsunde@gmail.com

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  53. There is so much suffering in the world, because people lean more on their understanding, than on God. People turn to drugs, to make a "feeling go away", people turn to gangs, to feel wanted, and to be a part of a "family". It is only when we fully, with all of our desire seek out God, that he can break the chains of our flesh, and stop generational curses. Just like you, I grew up, not getting "any voices", or "huge miracles", and so on. However, I feel as if it takes more faith to believe that there is no God. If you were to go down town, and look at the buildings, you would say that a man built the buildings at one time right? But do you see the man? Have you heard his voice? No, but we know that at one point some one was there laying in all the bricks, and putting in order of how the building was designed. It would be like putting pieces of a watch in to a shoe box, and shaking it in hopes of it coming together to form a perfectly working watch. And if it couldn't happen to something as simple as a watch, how could it happen to something as complex as our universe? Sir Isaac Newton once said" This most beautiful system of the sun planets and comets could only proceed from the counsel and dominion of an intelligent and powerful being." People may find it hard to believe that a God turned everything out of nothing, or, that nothing turned itself in to everything. which takes more faith to believe? And the "Moral Coad", evaluation, can not be explained where the sense of morals came from, How can we intuitively know that something is wrong, unless something is right? Unless God wrote it with in our eternal self's. God is a living, breathing, and active God that we should individually seek him out, to the fullest. You feel as if nothing got rooted in you as a child, than why do you feel the urge, and the void to lean on something, and pray, and want to have faith, and why wont that feeling go away? Sounds like to me, you are rooted, no matter how much you try to pull it out. Most people don't want to believe in Hell, because of fear, and I understand that. However, pretending that isn't there, isn't going to make it go away. There has been several accounts of people dyeing and going to hell. Jesus came to this earth, and died for our sins, so that we can have eternal life. He set out his commandments, for us to follow, for our own good, and to glorify Him. So that we can have hope, in this suffering world, and break chains to worldly habits, heal the sick, and be prepared for the spiritual war fair that is happening around us. What if I am wrong about all of this? But what if I'm not?

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  54. I've already commented, but wanted to come back and share this: science can provide an answer to many things, but it can't provide an answer for "miracles." If you experienced an actual miracle, would it change what you believed as a non-believer, because science wouldn't have an answer for it? I now you're an extremely intelligent, well-rounded woman who is interested in looking at all the facts and reasons why certain things in life happen, so if you ever interested in seeing a miracle with your own eyes, maybe consider attending a healing meeting where miracles are happening. It may not change what you believe, but could possibly enhance your knowledge of WHY others believe what they believe. Because, science can explain why miracles aren't happening. But, science can't explain why miracles are happening. If you're ever in Redding, California, I suggest visiting Bethel and seeing it as a fun learning experience as to why some people believe what they believe. :) http://bethelredding.com/ministries/healing-rooms

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  55. I don't understand how people can say that because bad things happen, they don't see how there can be a God. People do bad things, not God. God has given us CHOICE. And because of our choices, there are thousands of horrible consequences that may result. Either way, we have to have been created. Science says that we've evolved. How can people believe in evolution? If we evolved from monkeys, then why aren't monkeys still evolving? A question no one can answer. I feel pain for people who don't believe. I worry what will happen to those who don't believe, but are "good people". Where will they go? Hell? That scares me. God is love, and He says that no one knows love, unless they know Him.

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    Replies
    1. Humans did not evolve from monkeys. That is a common misconception.

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    2. Quinesha, please learn the basics about evolution so you can understand it before bashing it.

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    3. Another poignant question: if Adam and Eve were white, then why are there different races?

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  56. Hi Danielle, I've been reading your blog for years but don't often comment as I read it a lot on my phone now. I just wanted to say how much I loved this post and can relate to it. I find it hard to put into words my ideas on religion but if I could it would look like this. I was brought up in a religious family but as I got older it just didn't make sense to me, I couldn't find that faith in a god and my husband is exactly the same. I spent a good while wondering if I was missing out by not really believing in anything, wondering if I needed to have a faith but I think I do have faith in my husband, my boys, in my family and friends and I don't need that extra safety net. You have written about it so beautifully and respectfully, it is nice to see something like this out there as it is such an evocative subject. Just wanted to say I enjoyed reading it :)

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  57. Just had to comment again. :) I would have just gone on with my life, but you know when you've read a good book or seen a great movie, you just can't stay quiet about it! But more importantly it's the truth and if I didn't truly know it I wouldn't care about sharing about it and I wouldn't care about what you believe. Jesus is real.
    You do write on this topic often (IMO) and you definitely seem as though you are seeking. We all have a "God shaped hole" in our hearts.
    Much love to you. If you've never given something a chance, how can you be against it or discredit it? I would love to talk about this more, but I don't feel as though you would :(

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  58. I feel like you took the words right out of my mouth. I've been meaning to write about my atheism for a while as well, but I am apprehensive since people, especially relatives, get all judgy. I would love to read more about your journey and how you are going to raise your kids without god! not enough mommy blogs out there for that! Thanks for being so open

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  59. Love you for your honesty, openness, and heart. Always, always. I respect you so deeply, my friend, and I love when you post about this stuff.

    I grew up in a church environment where everyone "had all the answers." Everything was very black and white, and everyone seemed so sure that they had it all figured out. We weren't allowed to question anything, for fear of being labeled a "doubter." I wrestled with that for so long. How am I supposed to believe in anything if I can't ask questions? I felt like God and my faith were in a box, and I had to hold it and believe in it, but I wasn't allowed to look inside and unpack it and figure out how it works. Does that make sense? For years I struggled with that. When I was in college, a religion professor/pastor wrote me an email once (that I still have saved) that said: "Anyone who tells you that you can't question God's existence and that's it's "so easy" to believe and accept that this being exists, is full of shit. If this Cosmic Wonder, Powerful God, Divine Being is so "big and mighty," then surely they can handle our questions, our doubts, our pain, and our anger? Right? Don't ever feel sorry for questioning or doubting or walking away or talking about the hard stuff or asking or seeking. Be proud that you want to explore what's in your heart - whatever it is, whether I agree with it or not. Be proud of being restless and wanting more. We are not meant to be stagnant. We are not meant to silence our questions. We will never, ever have all the answers. We will never fully know the spiritual realm and all that it holds (or doesn't hold). But be certain that Love is always at the root, and it's the glue that holds everything, and if you believe even one thing about God, know that that God is love and only love and you are a part of that and that matters."

    My faith is not what it once was - it's growing and shifting and changing. I will never tell you that Christianity or any other faith or religion has all the answers. Because that's a lie. It's not that black and white. It's messy and emotional and hard and personal. I do believe in a God, and in Jesus, but it's so different and so love-filled compared to the judgmental, shaming, guilt-based "faith" I was taught growing up. I had to unlearn a lot, and relearn with fresh eyes and an open mind. I still question things, every day. And I've learned that that's okay. I've learned that I will never have everything figured out, and that the Bible isn't a rule book. (it's actually very patriarchal in so many ways, and it's very unclear about a lot of things, and it's something I'm still struggling with) What I do know, and what I CAN do, is love others the way Jesus did: wholeheartedly, authentically, subversively, equally. I believe in faith AND science, and love of all kinds, and people, and equality. I believe in myself. I believe in helping each other, and picking up those who get left behind or abandoned, and fighting for the rights of everyone. I believe that we all deserve to love and live in the ways that make us feel healthy and happy, and that love will only move us forward. And I believe in you.

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  60. It's always interesting to hear about other people's beliefs, and more so why they believe it. I also don't believe that the terrible things that happen in the world are "God's plan" or a lot of the other things people say when they don't really know what else to say. But you might be interested in this. If not, no harm done. Thanks for being so open!

    http://www.jw.org/en/video-why-study-the-bible/#?insight[search_id]=6dd6484e-eda1-4cf1-aa31-28ded991ef5f&insight[search_result_index]=0

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  61. I am no religion but my partner is a catholic, I think yeah it's nice to believe in something , that after all this we go to a better place ... but I don't think that is true. Religion has caused a lot of problems in the world in my opinion.... however no religion offends me people are free to think and believe what they want just as we are, I just think some ways in which people interpret religion is not right.

    A few weeks ago my partners mother suddenly became unwell I prayed to god (which is where I generally go when I am having a hard time in the hope that I am wrong) to get her through this, make her better, help her to live a little longer , two days later she passed away... These are reasons I don't believe anyone up there is listening. However I encourage my step daughter to believe I think it's a nice thing for children to believe that god is protecting them however when my step daughter asked me "why did god take grandma though why did he not take someone nasty?" I had a big lump in my throat and thought ... what do I say .. I told her god wanted to take grandma because she was such an amazing person he must have needed help in heaven ....

    Great post, raised some great points xox

    http://www.rainbowsandunicornsblog.co.uk/

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  62. Oops, I wrote a book, so ill separate.

    I read this blog post the night you posted it and I loved your transparency and honesty. I think your doubts are relatable to everyone. What I didn’t like, were some of the comments others posted. I kept thinking about it and had to come back and share a little bit of my heart.

    I was raised in church, by parents who were reasonable, not bible-thumpers full of judgment (thank goodness!) but loving people who were firm in their faith. I can’t say that I ever had this life-altering experience where I turned from a “rough walk of life” to a new one, but two events grew my faith and love for God; marrying my husband and having my three babies. While I was engaged I remember comparing to my belief in God to my belief in the fact that my husband was the one for me. I can’t prove to anyone or explain how I just KNOW my husband is the man for me, the one I can commit to for life. I just simply know, which is how I would say I know God is real. I wish it were more concrete, I wish I could say, I used to be blind and He literally touched me and now I can see. But I can’t. In a way, I think he may have designed it this way for a reason. Just as my husband loves the fact that I have faith in Him and in our marriage I think God loves when we are able to find faith in Him, and just a little faith is all it takes. He grows it. Then I had my little babies, oh my goodness. I bawled like a baby myself when I had them. I just couldn’t get over the fact that I grew those tiny amazing humans in my body and my love for each of them was indescribable. In the same way, I believe God created me, and knowing this helped me to understand that His love for me (and my own babies) is even greater than I can understand. It was so eye opening and overwhelming all in the same.

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  63. As I mentioned, some of the comments bothered me, and this is why. We are surrounded by religion. It's everywhere, the doctrines, the rules, and traditions... but some of that is so different from what the bible teaches. I've said already that I wish I knew the bible more, and I'll continue to read and study to understand what it is saying more deeply, but I do know that the Jesus I believe in didn't sit around telling people that Jesus loves them and that they are praying for them. He didn't sit back saying he didn't understand how people didn't believe in Him. Or "how can you not understand there is sin in the world if there were a God." It's so much more than that. Saying those things and reciting verses isn't enough. It's not about the things we say but what we do with our lives and WHO we are. God is relational; He is sympathetic and understanding. I believe in a Jesus who visited with drunks, and befriended prostitutes. I just can't handle the "sanitized religion" of people who are afraid to be around things that may give them a bad reputation, or that don't look churchy. The religion aspect is so built up and makes so many people hypocritical. None of us are perfect. Being a Christian doesn't mean you've got it together and are above sin. Sadly many people think that. Being a Christian is striving to be like Christ, being in relationship with him, and loving people. I can totally see why you question all the sin in the world. I do too!! I sit back thinking gosh, why doesn't God just remove the child abusers off the face of the world. I'm sure he would love to. But I also believe in Satan and sin, that because God gave us the gift of free will to choose how we live our lives, there will always be the bad in the world too. It's still so frustrating. Especially when things happen that don't seem to be an immediate result of sin (children dying young, accidents, 9/11) but in a sinful world there is disease and crazy fluke things.

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  64. Ultimately, I understand how you feel that way, this world is crazy at times. However, I have to cling to the hope that he will heal the hearts of the hurting and bring good from the terrible situations.

    My mom was raised Mormon. Her life was full of rules and structure and teachings she didn't understand. One night in her room she felt lost and so desperate. She just prayed, God if you are real, prove to me, reveal yourself to me. Provide comfort I can't understand. She decided to give her life to God that night. She decided that she didn't want to figure things out for herself anymore and has been on her own journey (many ups and many downs) ever since.

    Anyways, I just had to share my thoughts. You have a beautiful family and I love reading about your motherhood journey! I can't help but think we would be friends (and our kids too) if I knew you in person! I apologize for those who say things totally out of line, especially when they're claiming to be Christians. I would like to see everyone speak with a little more love!

    Allyson

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  65. thanks for sharing, i too feel very similar and the moment you tell others you don't or don't know or anything that isn't YES, you feel something happen, change or judged. Its refreshing to me to hear i'm not alone in this way of thinking, thank you for sharing.

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  66. Dear Danielle,

    This is an amazingly courageous post to write! I am so happy to finally find this somewhere in the blogosphere. It's a very refreshing sound! I find it very important for agnostic people to put their word out there too, to chime in. It's about time. And from what I have seen here so far in the comments, to not be judged! That is how it should be. Bravo for being so brave and kind.

    Regards, E

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  67. Heck. Yes. Thank you for having the guts to say your viewpoint in a very religious-centered arena. I am an athiest and almost all blogs I read frequently mention their religion.

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  68. I've been going to church every week for as long as I can remember - some weekends it's about God and some weekends it's about singing with the church choir, it flip flops. Most people think that the fact that I go to church every week means that I'm a very strict Catholic, which isn't actually the case - I use it as a place to meditate and to think about the future and to think about the bigger picture. That's not to say that I don't believe in God, because I do - but I definitely struggle with a lot of the things you mentioned above.

    Recently I started dating somebody who doesn't believe in God, and it's created an interesting dilemma in my brain. I'm pretty open-minded and I believe in being a good person (which he his) - and I'm in this place where I'm trying to separate what I believe, what just become tradition, and what's part of my Italian culture. It's been an adventure. I think we're all always questioning - and it makes for interesting conversations if nothing else. Thanks for sharing, Danielle, always appreciated.

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  69. Thank you for sharing this post. I grew up as a Christian and was very involved in church from a young age. It was a huge part of my life. I started to question, and slowly my beliefs faded away as I realized it just did not make sense for me. I was still in church leadership, pretending I believed until I eventually left, but most of my family and old church friends have no idea I no longer believe. It's not something that is easy to share because it means I'm losing a community and alienating myself from a good majority of people I meet. Seeing a post like this makes me feel less alone, and it helps show others that not believing in god doesn't make you a mean, evil, angry person. Thanks for using the reach of your blog to show that.

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  70. These are the types of response I find infuriating as a 'non-believer'. As I always say, the burden of proof isn't sitting at my door, it is at yours. The definition of faith is to believe in something with no proof or evidence of it's reality. It's a lovely idea but as far as I'm concerned, it's just a story made up a long time ago. And not a particularly pleasant one at that. It's the excuse for hideous behaviour by human beings. Religion is judgemental, pushy & egotistical. No person or book has the right to tell me who to love, how to dress or how to spend my time. I choose a life filled with things that make me happy! My life is complete because I've made it that way, by cutting out the bad & holding on to the good. And those boundaries are set by me and no-one else. So Dani, you shouldn't be called brave for posting this, you have just as much right as anyone else.

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  71. Hi Danielle, I just stumbled across your blog a couple of days ago and have enjoyed looking around! And on this post, I totally hear you. I know exactly what you mean when you say you grew up going to church and wanting to believe, but it just not happening. It was the same for me. I would always look around at the "good" people in the pews next to me, feeling inadequate because clearly I was missing something, wondering what the secret was, not understanding how anybody could trust God or Jesus when all I could see was a distant character described in an ancient book. I "asked Jesus into my heart" more times than I can count, I read the bible, I prayed. But I couldn't shake the sense that whatever faith I was trying to grasp for myself was empty. For a number of years I wavered between doubt, confusion, and indifference. I don't think I expected anything to ever change. But then- when I really wasn't even looking for it- it did change. It's crazy to try to describe it, but during a random, spur of the moment read through a few chapters in the book of Mathew (in college), um, how do I say this... Jesus came for me. And with wide, open arms, He opened my eyes and made me a part of His family. I didn't even realize what was happening in the moment. All I knew was there was this light, peace, and hope that I'd never experienced before. I went out, bought a bible, started reading it (and for the first time ever, it made sense to me!). And that was the start of my journey with God. I know it's impossible to understand without experiencing it, I was in the same spot for a long long time. But all the same, I just want you to know that you are created in the image of our God, that you are loved, that you are pursued, and that I'm praying for you! There is, is, IS, hope. There are answers. And- as much as I agree with you that we are ALL going to find out we're wrong about SO many things!- I'm convinced of this one thing; our journey in faith begins when Christ comes for us, not when we "go looking" for Him. So that's my heartfelt prayer for you and for your family. That He would find you with the same open arms that found me and shower you with His grace and goodness and truth.

    With love, Sarah
    www.sarahkeller.com

    P.S. I wouldn't blame you for categorizing me with the rest of the "crazies", but if you want to read a little more about my testimony, it's here: http://sarahmkeller.blogspot.com/2013/01/his-story.html

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  72. I know I'm a little late to the game, but..... whatever higher power we choose to acknowledge, God, Buddha, Ala, science.... the real questions come when we feel a "lack of".... the good-faith effort we put into our belief system, the basic principals - be kind, don't judge, don't kill, etc - karma - those are what keep us good, honest people. I was born & raised Catholic, and am very happily a practicine Catholic, but that doesn't mean I don't argue with God, question His "path" for me every day, and bring Him down to a very human level. I don't believe there's a reason for everything, I believe it's our actions and reactions that help us to justify why bad things happen to good people - it's our nature to find a reason. Sometimes, when I'm in my "I'm not talking to you, God" moods, I still put my prayers out there, but I do it in the form of a real conversation... to nobody, to people who have passed, to Saints... more of a venting "WTF"... whatever deity we choose or don't choose to acknowledge, I feel that deity uses us whether we know it or not.

    Way to put yourself out there. It's not easy. And, no matter what belief a read practices, you know we have all had those same doubts and questions and fears - Is it right? Why haven't I heard any responses to my prayers? How can the loss of so many wonderful lives be part of anyone's plan? We are a world of "fairness" and when something happens that we can't justify, something that's not "fair", we will always question the bigger picture.... keep questioning, and have faith in the greater good. FAITH is more important that any one religion.

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  73. I can't tell you how much I love this post. It's so relate-able to me, not because I don't believe in God, but because I do. Because my spirituality is so personal to me, so raw that I tend not to talk of it too often.

    It honestly surprised me to hear people say how isolated they feel in their non-belief when so often that is how I feel in my belief!

    I don't totally understand why people feel threatened by one another, by our perspectives, by our understanding or beliefs about the world and beyond. Why we feel the need to demean or hide behind any cause, really. I have a lot of theories and thought that aren't particularly important at this time.

    But in any case, I just wanted to say thank you. Your thoughts are beautiful.

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  74. Recently, I just lost my baby nephew. He only lived a mere 7 months. It is so hard to imagine that there was any good purpose for him dying so young, and I really went through a lot of anger and pain trying to reconcile his bleak future. I think saying it's God's plan is sort of cliché, and really who wants to hear that when they're grieving. I don't! Seems inhumane! I know Jesus grieved when Lazarus died, and I know he experienced what tears my heart in two. I believe God is compassionate and gracious...you see that in Jesus (not his followers shouting anti-gay sentiments). Luke's life was so short but I really think his purpose was in his name. Luke means light, and his middle name is Elias which means Yahweh is my god. For a baby that had to suffer so much, he truly was a light. His smile was so radiant. Don't know how I got here but thought I would share. Much love.

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  75. I appreciated your sincerity as well as your welcoming of those who have another view.

    I struggle with this too. I am not confident that there is a God, but I'd like to be. I wish if God were real he would you show himself to me. And if he did, I'd no longer have any doubt at all. That hasn't happened yet though. That said, I think I have heard enough accounts of miraculous things happening that it gives me pause to ask anew whether their is a God. The alternative of science continually surprises, but has also let me down. Scientific thought seems to change like the wind blows. Sure, there are few things that stand the test of time. We all know that gravity is a force constantly at work. Thus, the fear of heights. Though other ideas are continually disproven. For example, Pluto was recently discovered to be a geological active planet, even though planetary scientist had though it was a dead planet. Not so.

    So my struggle goes on. I see in myself a need for God. As much as I want to love others, I find that I love myself more. I am not filled with the same love as you perhaps. There is a certain incompleteness in me. I need something to fill it. Is religion what is needed though? I also don't want to be part of something that's going to judge me and damn me to hell.

    Christianity though has a strong pull though. Appreciating the sincerity of the writers throughout history persuades me to want to believe. Secular sources such as Josephus confirm that Jesus Christ was a real figure in history. Further, the stories of the martyrdom of the Christian disciples also make me ask why, if not real, would they have endured such suffering for something that was false.

    At the end of the day, I have hope. The questions that you raise about human suffering are valid ones. If Adam and Eve fell into Sin, why did God let them live. Why didn't he just end it right there? Instead, this God permits untold suffering over the span of human existence. And then in satisfaction of the sin of Adam and Eve, God sends his own innocent beloved Son, Jesus Christ, to suffer death and hell for the sake of Adam and Eve. What kind of God is this? He let's the wicked live, while is own is slaughtered. This is not just, this is not right. And that's why Satan must hate him so. Because God is Love. What a wonderful mystery?
    I, and I dare say we, have hope. And in having hope, we have peace that this world can't comprehend. Where I have doubt, I beg God to forgive my unbelief. And he does, he forgives all us beggars.

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  76. Well God Almighty made "science", Danielle...

    I found this old video to be interesting, helps bring up some of those design questions to non-believers. Many atheists keep asking me: "How do you know God is real"? (LOL)

    "For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse:" (Romans 1:20 KJV)

    Science - The Bible's Best Friend (1 of 3)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBOsxIREHEI

    Jesus called people not only to follow his teachings, but to follow Him. He said: "I am the light.", "I am the door.", "Come to me...", "I am the way, the truth and the life; NO MAN cometh unto the Father, BUT BY ME." In claiming to be THE TRUTH, Christ goes beyond all "prophets" and teachers who simply said they were speaking the truth.

    Jesus identified himself as equal to God. He even gave proof. Jesus said that he would be crucified on a cross and that three days after his death, he would come back to life. He didn't say he would reincarnate someday into a future life. :) He said three days after being buried he would show himself alive to those who saw his crucifixion. On that third day, Jesus' tomb was found empty. Many people testified that they saw Him alive again.

    Jesus now offers Eternal Life to ALL those who CHOOSE to believe on Him. This is Truth.

    Danielle, my hope and prayer is that you will find one day that God is real and the Bible is true. Fulfilled prophecy helps me know the Bible is true. ALL world religions have nothing to do with Jesus Christ. Christianity is NOT a Religion While religion says DO, Jesus says DONE. Religion adds rules that don’t exist in the Bible. Christianity is about what God has already DONE to provide us the opportunity to be right with Him.

    Danielle, you may not believe the Bible, but Jesus did... Was He a liar?

    I choose to be on God’s side in this great battle of God Almighty vs. Satan. God is destined to win. Make sure you are on His side, Danielle!


    Cristina, a sinner saved by grace

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  77. I recently started following you on Bloglovin' and am so glad I did. I know this post is old now, but what a well written and thoughtful thing. When I got back into blogging in 2014 I realized, more than ever, that the blogging world was saturated with women who believed in God and I felt really disconnected. I felt like I should be ashamed, even though I wasn't. It was kind of the way I feel living in this small town in Ohio.

    Anyway, reading your post and the comments made me feel good. I totally agree with your sentiments and appreciate the time you took to post.

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